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Dept of Interior to shift away from ‘project-by-project’ management

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell has unveiled the outlines of a new landscape-level mitigation strategy across millions of acres of federal land that she said is designed to take the department’s agencies away from narrowly focused project-by-project assessments. The mitigation strategy includes four key objectives the department will work to implement in the coming months in an effort to take a broader approach to managing public lands – landscape-level planning, banking, in-lieu fee arrangements and other mitigation tools.
READ MORE AT  http://www.eenews.net/greenwire/2014/04/10/stories/1059997717

NC House Committee on Wetland and Stream Mitigation to meet Feb. 27

NORTH CAROLINA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

The House Committee on Wetland and Stream Mitigation (LRC)(2013) will meet at the following time:

Thursday

February 27, 2014

9:00 AM

544 Legislative Office Bldg

Map: http://www.ncleg.net/graphics/downtownmap.pdf

Co-Chairs
Rep. David R. Lewis (Co-Chair) House Appointment
Rep. Chris Millis (Co-Chair) House Appointment
Legislative Members
Rep. Kelly M. Alexander, Jr. House Appointment
Rep. Becky Carney House Appointment
Rep. Rick Catlin House Appointment
Rep. Kelly E. Hastings House Appointment
Rep. Charles Jeter House Appointment
Rep. Chuck McGrady House Appointment
Rep. Garland E. Pierce House Appointment
Rep. Phil Shepard House Appointment
Rep. Paul Stam House Appointment
LRC Member
Rep. Tim Moore Ex Officio

2014 National Mitigation and Ecosystem Banking Conference, Session 1 – Aligning Agency Programs

Kicking off the educational track at this May’s National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking conference, this session is classified as “advanced” but the presenters’ topics could not be of more importance in today’s changing world.

Moderator: Erik J. Meyers, The Conservation Fund
As a Vice President at The Conservation Fund, Erik Meyers works to advance business strategy for mitigation opportunities, mainly for projects that impact energy, water and transportation infrastructure. He also chairs the Board of Directors of the Natural Capital Investment Fund, advises companies on sustainability initiatives, manages relationships with water-related agencies, and oversees climate adaptation projects. Working with the Fund since 2004, Erik has led an array of efforts, including a pioneering climate adaptation project to help vital coastal ecosystems persist despite sea level rise. He holds a B.S.F.S. from Georgetown University and a J.D. from Fordham University School of Law.

Travis Hemmen, Westervelt Ecological Services, “Habitat Conservation Plans – A New Market or Challenge?”
Mr. Hemmen directs the Business and Market Development for WES. Mr. Hemmen coordinates with private and public clients on project specific mitigation and manages sales of existing bank credits. Mr. Hemmen identifies potential site acquisitions, analyzes market information to ensure the finished mitigation banks are a viable product. He has a background in environmental consulting and regulatory compliance planning for a national home builder. As a consultant, he has managed small- and large-scale projects, including state and federal permitting of projects by local water agencies, port redevelopment and dredging programs, and development of master planned communities. He has a B.A. degree in Biology with an emphasis in Ethics from the University of Northern Iowa, and a M.S. degree in Environmental Law and Policy with an emphasis in Alternative Dispute Resolution from Vermont Law School.

Roselle Henn, USACE North Atlantic Division, “Potential for Sage Mitigation Banking”
Ms. Hemm is Environmental Team Leader for the North Atlantic Division (NAD) of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) with primary responsibility for ecosystem restoration throughout the region and the Environmental Lead in the Hurricane Sandy North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study (NACCS), National Planning Center of Expertise for Coastal Storm Risk Management (PCX-CSRM). While compiling the study, scientists and engineers will consider future sea-level rise scenarios and integrate economic, climatological, engineering, environmental and societal data from Virginia to Maine to develop a comprehensive framework to reduce coastal flood risk and promote resiliency. The study will be collaborative, comprehensive and integrated, and conducted in partnership with federal, tribal, state and local government representatives as well as non-government organizations, academia, technical experts and interested parties.

Steve Glomb, US Department of the Interior, “National Resource Damage Assessment & Restoration and Other Opportunities”
The U.S. Department of the Interior’s (DOI) Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Program (NRDA Restoration Program) manages the confluence of the technical, ecological, biological, legal, and economic disciplines and coordinates the efforts of six bureaus and four other offices within DOI to accomplish the mission.  The NRDA Restoration Program has a nationwide presence encompassing nearly the full span of natural and cultural resources for which the Secretary of the Interior has trust responsibility and authority.  Each bureau has its unique natural resource trusteeship and brings its expertise to bear on relevant sites. The NRDA Restoration Program is a truly integrated Department-wide program, drawing upon the interdisciplinary strengths of its five bureaus (Indian Affairs, Land Management, Reclamation, Fish & Wildlife Service, and National Parks Service.)

I look forward to seeing you in Denver in May!

Dr. David Robinson: Father of Full-Delivery Mitigation

We just returned from the National Mitigation Banking Conference last week in Sacramento, where old friend David Robinson gave an excellent presentation on the benefits of “Full-Delivery” mitigation procurement systems. You can also view it here on his website:  http://www.full-delivery.com/

By way of background, as some readers will know, the NC Ecosystem Enhancement program is North Carolina’s unique, state-wide, non-regulatory, Fee Program. The NCEEP sells hundreds of millions of dollars of mitigation to the public and the government at government established rates. The NCEEP is the funnel through which the vast majority of mitigation in North Carolina flows.

The program develops the mitigation sold to the public in two ways.  ”In-House,” where the state identifies the land and purchases it themselves, then contracts with separate firms to design, construct, and care for the site, with no firm responsible for the entire project, and various state employees responsible for various parts.

Or, the NCEEP accomplishs the mitigation by conducting a bonded, public, low-bid system called “Full-Delivery.” In the Full-Delivery system, companies like Restoration Systems will identify and contract for the purchase of the land privately; and, if awarded, acquire, design, construct, and care for the site long term — with all resulting credits accruing to the state.

Back to Dr. Robinson. David was instrumental in the development of Full-Delivery mitigation as the preferred alternative for large state purchases of compensatory mitigation in North Carolina. He mid-wifed the birth of the innovative procurement system at the Department of Transportation in the 1990’s and has seen it adopted by other agencies, and other states, lately including South Carolina.

Robinson makes the case here that large government purchases of environmental mitigation should utilize a competitive “Full-Delivery” procurement model that lowers costs, reduces risk for the buyer and stimulates green jobs for the economy.

Take it away Dr. D….

Robinson on Full-Delivery mitigation for wetlands, streams and other natural assets

THIS JUST IN: All Corps Mitigation Permit Decisions Must be Documented

All:

Today we received very good news! As of October 26th all permit decisions which the Corps makes must document decision making process for mitigation. This is significant because the mitigation rule (33 CFR 332.3) defines a mitigation hierarchy which has mitigation banking as the preferred method of mitigation. The Association has been fighting since the mitigation rule came into existence in 2008 for the Corps to follow the preference found in the rule. This directive requires that the permit officer document his/her decision making process which should have the effect of causing additional compliance with the hierarchy. I want to thank each and every one of you who have participated in this fight at both the District level and at HQ level for the hard work it has taken to achieve this milestone. We will be discussing this directive on the regular monthly NMBA call (Thursday, November 18th, 10 to 11 am Eastern,1-866-305-2467 access number 836122)

We hope you will participate in the call.

Thank you,

Victoria K. Colangelo

Click & link to:
The new Department of the Army Memorandum Documenting Nationwide Permit Template
&
Chief, Operation & regulatory Division letter discussing Minimum Level of Documentation required for Permit Decisions

Ecosystem Marketplace: Mitigation Bankers Say Army Corps Not Following the Rule

From Hannah Kett and Ecosystem Marketplace

According to law, if you damage a wetland in the US, you must restore a comparable piece of property in the same watershed. A 2008 regulatory rule says wetland credits from a mitigation bank should be your first option. Mitigation banks, however, say this isn’t happening, and they want the Army Corps of Engineers to tell them why. The Corps says it’s just trying to be flexible – and promises more transparency in the future.

29 September 2010 | In April, 2008, wetland scientist Rich Mogensen read “The Rule” and speculated that the number of wetland mitigation banks in the United States could triple from 500 then to 1500 right about now as a result of its issuance.

Officially titled the Compensatory Mitigation Rule for Losses of Aquatic Resources, the Rule was jointly issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (with a push from Congress), and it declared that anyone who damages a US wetland should look first to mitigation bankers to compensate for the damage before exploring other alternatives.

National Mitigation Banking Association letter to Army Corps of Engineers regarding the implementation Fede… Read more

Survey: Bankers and others queried on-line regarding Credit Stacking

Several folks at Restoration Systems received an invitation today to take an on-line survey from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).  EPRI is a farsighted Washington think tank deeply involved in the analysis of environmental markets.  The subject of the survey is so-called “credit stacking,” the practice that led recently to the controversial “double-dip” of mitigation here in North Carolina.

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NMBA: The More the Merrier!

There’s a membership drive underway at the National Mitigation Banking Association.  NMBA is an invaluable organization for mitigation bankers and providers, consultants, service industries — or anyone else with a stake in successful, professional, mitigation.

If you are tipped off to join NMBA by “Stories from the Field,” make sure and let me know, so RS can snag a free conference registration for this year’s National Mitigation Banking Conference in Austin, Texas!  Join now, and we’ll see you in Austin, partner.

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