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Neuse River unleashed as Raleigh's Milburnie Dam removal completed 

 

Raleigh’s Milburnie Dam is gone, unleashing the Neuse River

By Richard Stradling rstradling@newsobserver.com

Neuse River unleashed as Raleigh’s Milburnie Dam removal completed  [LINK]
November 27, 2017 02:06 PM

RALEIGH
Less than two weeks after workers began clawing away at it, the Milburnie Dam is gone, and the Neuse River is flowing freely through Raleigh for the first time in centuries.

The dam was built of stone and concrete in about 1900 to harness the river for power, creating what was essentially a narrow six-mile-long lake on the east side of Raleigh. It replaced a timber dam that was built to power a paper mill before the Civil War and which succeeded earlier dams, said George Howard, CEO of of Restoration Systems, the Raleigh company that is removing it.

Restoration Systems is spending millions to restore this stretch of the river to its natural state. The company will make that back by selling mitigation credits to governments or developers who are required to compensate for destroying streams and wetlands elsewhere.

Its largest customer, Howard said, will likely be the N.C. Department of Transportation, which will in essence pay to restore six miles of the Neuse River to partially make up for the streams and other habitat it will destroy in building N.C. 540 across southern Wake County in the coming years.

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RS Video: Katy Prairie Stream Mitigation Bank

Restoration Systems was thrilled to see the final cut of the video below RS produced to profile our Katy Prairie Stream Mitigation Bank. The point of a corporate video of this kind is to help explain a project, so I will keep the narrative here to a minimum. Suffice to say, however, that we are immensely proud of this mitigation bank and our many partners; particularly, the Warren Family and the Katy Prairie Conservancy; our stream design team, KBR, Stantec and Forbes Consultancy; our contractor Land Mechanic Designs, and planter Stuckey Seeding — among many others.

We will be turning dirt out on the prairie for years to come, so this is unlikely to be the last version of the film. It will be fun taking footage of the site as it matures — over the next several decades — and including it in an evolving series of similar productions from Human Films.

Stay tuned!

Workshop – Implementing the Galveston Stream Tool

On October 26th a workshop will be held in Houston, Texas to discuss the Interim Stream Condition Assessment Standard Operating Procedure which was recently put on the street by the Galveston Corps District.   This workshop is free and open to the public so if you would like to attend please visit the webpage and RSVP.  The workshop is key to anyone working on projects that may impact streams within Galveston District.

There will be three topics discussed during this workshop-

  • Jayson Hudson and Dwayne Johnson (USACE) will present on the Stream Condition Assessment SOP and how it should be implemented.
  • Lee Forbes (KBR) will discuss stream restoration techniques and present local project examples.
  • And RS’s very own Travis Hamrick will discuss our newest stream bank servicing the Houston Metro area- The Katy Prairie Stream Mitigation Bank.

 

We expect this workshop to be well attended (100+ people responded on the first day) so please RSVP to insure that there is enough room for everyone. See you there!

Video: Bear Creek Mitigation Bank under construction in October, 2001.

Here is some old video I took when Bear Creek was first being restored from farm to wetland forest in 2001. I need to take a similar video today, but recent still photos of the site can be seen in the post a few days ago.

Hint: Turn down your volume.

VIDEO: Carbonton Dam river trip before removal…set to music!

Here’s a short music video I made following a preliminary reconnaissance trip on the Deep River hosted by Restoration Systems for the NC Division of Water Quality. Three years later, in 2006, we removed the Carbonton Dam in order to restore the area through which we are traveling from impoundment to natural river. The lowered impoundment revealed rapids and channel features not seen since the early 1800s. The newly restored river has subsequently thrived, including the re-establishment of the federal listed Threatened and Endangered Cape Fear Shiner, which was reported nationwide.