Restoration Systems featured in Triangle Business Journal

Surprisingly perhaps, over seventeen years in business RS has never had a “business” article written about our firm. We have had specific projects covered as ecological interest stories, and even some controversy, but never a word in the business pages or the local biz journal.

But last year we decided finally to show some leg and entered the Triangle Business Journal’s ‘Fast Fifty’ growing companies competition. We were surprised (to say the least if you saw us jumping up and down) to place….drum roll please….#2!!

One thing led to another and RS was the featured company in TBJ this week. Considering how dynamic and prosperous our region is, it is a genuine thrill to be covered so well in these pages. Amanda Hoyle did a great job and we look forward to providing her — and you — more frequent updates regarding our progress as a business.

A business that banks on regulations by Restoration Systems, LLC

A business that banks on regulations

Friends since high school and college, George Howard and John Preyer are used to the confused looks they often get when they explain the business model of Restoration Systems LLC, the company they started together in 1998.

The company specializes in environmental mitigation banking, a field of business that didn’t exist before 1995. That was the year that the federal guidelines for mitigation banks were established as a compromise option under the Clean Water Act of 1973, the federal government’s primary law governing water pollution.

Former U.S. Sen. Lauch Faircloth, R-NC, then a member of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, helped craft the federal guidance for mitigation banking. And John Preyer, at the time, was serving as his legislative director.

And to that, a niche industry – and a business plan for Restoration Systems – was born.

Mitigation banks offer a third alternative that didn’t exist before for developers of roads, utilities and buildings that might be doing damage to a nearby water resource, such as a stream or wetland.

If trying to qualify for an environmental permit, a property owner or developer must:

1) Avoid the protected property altogether if possible;
2) Minimize the potential damage or impact to the property; and
3) When all else fails, mitigate.

“And in that order,” Preyer says.

“We come in at the end of the day, after they have already worked to avoid and minimize,” he says. “If you are looking for a positive environmental outcome, we are doing it.”

Restoration Systems proactively finds and buys conservation easements from property owners for the purpose of restoring streams and wetlands or protecting threatened species from the future encroachment of development and growth. Once a project has been signed off on by both federal and state agencies, the company sets up a mitigation bank, or a system in which to sell “credits” or pieces of a restored stream or wetland to help make up for any damage that might be done to a nearby water resource from another construction project. Credits can cost $14,000 each, or it might be cheaper if it’s a large transaction. The company also manages restoration projects on behalf of government partners or companies that don’t have to be sold through a mitigation bank.

Preferably, Howard says, the impacted projects “share the raindrop” with the stream or wetland property so that the damaged and the improved property impact the same body of water.

Mitigation banking is usually a last-ditch option for builders, but it’s a a growing industry that Restoration Systems is helping take nationwide.

It’s also one of the most-regulated industries in the environmental market, Howard says.

“Developers don’t want to have to pay for credits. Conservation interests don’t want development there in the first place. We have to answer to everybody,” he says. “It’s the good guys and the bad guys these days, and we like being the good guys.”

Restoration Systems is currently overseeing 50 mitigation banks and restoration sites in nine states, with a majority of them in North Carolina. It has restoration sites within the Falls Lake watershed in Raleigh and along the Cape Fear River watershed in southeastern counties.

In Texas, the company has partnered with Morehead Capital Management, a Raleigh-based hedge fund, and a Texas land trust to restore more than 20 miles of streams on the Katy Prairie near Houston. The project is the largest permitted stream mitigation bank in the U.S.

Restoration Systems is also a lead partner in the sale of off-set credits to companies in the wind, oil and energy industries across the Southern Great Plains.

Howard shows from a aerial map the desolate lands in northern Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas that Restoration Systems has invested in to preserve sufficient grassland habitats for the lesser prairie chicken, a threatened species whose population has dwindled to around 17,000 birds in recent years.

This breed of bird is particularly sensitive to things that are taller than its grassy habitat – like the oil rigs that dot the landscape of the Southern Great Plains.

“They don’t like anything over three feet tall, or they’ll stop mating,” Howard explains,

Since the company was founded, the partners estimate the company has sold about $110 million in credit inventory in fits and starts over the years. It brought in about $20 million in revenue in 2014, mostly from the sale of mitigation bank credits, which was up from $6 million in revenue in 2012, according to Chief Financial Officer Buzz Floyd.

“With these bigger projects, we’ve caught the eye of national investment firms, and the deals are getting more sophisticated,” Floyd says.

Their goal moving forward is to smooth out that revenue stream and keep a more stable inventory of credits to sell in the parts of the country where demand is expected to grow.

“We are all about regulation in our business,” Howard says. “It creates our business.”

Amanda Hoyle covers commercial and residential real estate. Follow her on Twitter @TBJrealestate

North Carolina, Neuse River Basin Dam Removal Paying Dividends for Anadromous Fish

Anadromous fish are those, such as shad, that return to freshwater to spawn after spending part of their lives in the ocean. Bennett Wynne, the North Carollina Wildlife Resources Commission’s Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator is quoted as saying “In the Neuse River, hickory shad have been more abundant. Last week, we picked up a few around Goldsboro, along with some American shad. I am cautiously optimistic about shad numbers. Removing dams is important to both species but more so for American shad because they prefer spawning on the rockier substrate above the fall line. Most of the hickory shad population is found from Kinston downstream, where Pitchkettle Creek is the historical place where fishermen catch them. Last year we had strong flows in the river and we saw a good turnout of anglers at Milburnie Dam near Raleigh in Wake County. It is great that we can have a fishery for shad that far inland.”
READ MORE AT  http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/04/09/3771485/neuse-shad-run-nears-peak-numbers.html?sp=/99/103/126/

NC Governor Calls for Removing Coal Ash Ponds from Waterways

As national attention remains focused on North Carolina in wake of Duke Energy’s coal ash spill into the Dan River, North Carolina’s Governor has now called on Duke Energy and North Carolina officials to address the long-term problem of coal ash storage throughout the state in the only way that will stop ongoing pollution and remove the risk of more spills: move the ash. “We’re pleased to see that Governor McCrory has recognized that removing toxic coal ash from the banks of our rivers and drinking reservoirs – the long-term solution that is working today in South Carolina – is the also right solution for North Carolina and our region,” said Frank Holleman, a senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center.

READ MORE AT http://bit.ly/1jOb5jv

Forestry Management in Riparian Buffers

A Guide to Implementing Neuse River Basin and Tar-Pamlico River Basin Riparian Buffer Rules for Forest Management Activities was published by the NC Forest Service in July 2012 but worth re-reading or reading for the first time. The rules apply to perennial streams, intermittent streams, ponds, lakes, and estuaries located in either river basin. READ MORE at http://ncforestservice.gov/publications/Forestry%20Leaflets/WQ11.pdf

Overbank Flooding Event, Pancho Mitigation Bank

Overbank sedimentation during flood events represents an important component of stream restoration success. In addition to its importance for floodplain development, overbank deposition of fine sediment frequently results in a significant reduction of the suspended sediment load transported through a river system to the catchment outlet.

For details on Restoration Systems’ Pancho Wetland, Stream and Nutrient Mitigation Bank in the Neuse River Basin (now in Monitoring Year 2), go to
http://www.restorationsystems.com/projects/pancho-stream-wetland-nutrient-mitigation-bank/

Bass Mountain Stream and Nutrient Bank under construction

Five recent photos of construction on Bass Mountain Stream and Nutrient Bank.

Click on the link below for a map of the service area and a drone-taken video:
http://www.restorationsystems.com/projects/bass-mountain/

Southern Environmental Law Center – North Carolina Activity Update

The Southern Environmental Law Center is using the power of the law to champion North Carolina’s environment — from clean energy and healthy air, to rivers and wetlands, to the protection of special places from the Smokies to the Outer Banks. SELC has offices in Chapel Hill and Asheville. SELC is focusing on several transportation projects, including the Monroe Bypass and the replacement Bonner Bridge as well as overall transportation financing reform, Cape Hatteras National Seashore wildlife protection, and the Titan American cement plant in the Cape Fear River basin.

For the latest information on SELC’s current efforts in North Carolina, go to http://www.southernenvironment.org/north_carolina/

RS buddy Eddie Bridges wins huge national award: Field and Stream’s Conservation Hero of the Year!

Wow. Long-time dear friend of Restoration Systems, Mr. Eddie Bridges, has been honored with a huge award: Field and Stream’s Conservation Hero of the Year.

John Preyer and George Howard have known and respected Eddie Bridges since they were kids growing up in Greensboro. Eddie’s organization, the NC Wildlife Habitat Foundation, holds the protective easements on more than 1000 acres of RS mitigation at multiple locations which we have permanently endowed with over $300,000.

John Preyer was honored to join Eddie at RS’ Haw River mitigation site to shoot the Field and Stream video below (cue the tall guy in dark blue shirt!).

 

Raleigh News and Observer: Plan for Little River dam sets up a fight

Raleigh News & Observer: Plan for Little River dam sets up a Fight

Green for Green!

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